Loch Lomond Pond Plumbing Page

This page describes the plumbing of our backyard pond, Loch Lomond (jr.).

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Last Updated: August 30, 1997.

Go to the Loch Lomond Pond Page.

This material is Copyright 1997 Craig Buchanan. All rights reserved. This page may be freely linked to.
Please send comments or questions to
mailto: buchananc@acm.org.


Plumbing Overview

The diagram below shows the basic layout of the pond's plumbing

The pump house pumps water from one end of the pond, through a pipe buried beside the pond to the biofilter. The biofilter aerates the water and passes it through a layer of lava rock which acts as a biological filter. The water is then fed through another pipe to the spillway. The spillway is an open trough lined with attractive rocks collected from the Thirty Thousand Islands in the Georgian Bay. The water falls off the end of the spillway into the pond.

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Plumbing Schematic

The diagram below shows a simplified schematic of the pond's plumbing.

The diagram is obviously not to scale and the lengths of the various pipes are misleading. Water from the pond enters the pump house through the skimmer. The pump house contains the skimmer and the reservoir. The water passes through the skimmer basket which collects leaves and other debris. The water then flows into the reservoir. The reservoir is gravity fed, the reservoir inlet is lower than the pond inlet. The water then passes through three layers of filter material which collect dirt. The pump then pumps the water out of the reservoir and through a valve used to control the rate of discharge. The water level in the reservoir is a few inches less than the level in the skimmer due to the pump. (A submersible pump's output can be controlled but its input should never be controlled.) The water then leaves the pump house and travels to the other end of the pond where the biofilter and spillway reside.

The water can take two routes to the spillway, each controlled by a valve. One route goes through the biofilter and the other bypasses the biofilter. The valves are adjusted so that the water level in the biofilter remains constant. (This is easier than it sounds as the flow rate from the biofilter increases with the height of the water in the biofilter, making it self adjusting within a small range.) The water entering the biofilter is sent into a spraybar which has two sets of holes which spray at about 45 degrees to the vertical. The water then passes through lava rock and into collection pipes at the bottom of the biofilter. The collection pipes have many holes to allow water in from all directions. The water collects and travels back up to the biofilter discharge. The discharge travels through a pipe and empties into the spillway. The biofilter bypass simply runs around the biofilter and empties into the spillway. The water then travels down the spillway and falls back into the pond.

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Plumbing Pictures

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This material is Copyright 1997 Craig Buchanan. All rights reserved. This page may be freely linked to.
Please send comments or questions to
mailto: buchananc@acm.org.